AAR President Adele Chatfield-Taylor FAAR’84 Receives 12th Vincent Scully Prize

In Washington DC, AAR President Adele Chatfield-Taylor FAAR’84 accepts the 2010 Vincent Scully Prize

The National Building Museum (Washington DC) has selected Adele Chatfield-Taylor FAAR’84, President of the American Academy in Rome, to receive its 2010 Vincent Scully Prize, one of the most significant distinctions in the architecture and design fields. The Prize was awarded “for her notable work encouraging excellence in the design world while ensuring that planning, architecture, and preservation remain relevant and connected to the public”.

In announcing Chatfield-Taylor’s selection for the 12th Vincent Scully Prize, members of the jury—chair David Schwarz, Deborah Berke, Ned Cramer, and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk RAAR’88—noted that through a variety of positions in her career, “Ms. Chatfield-Taylor has consistently promoted excellence in the design world, while ensuring that the planning, architecture, and historic preservation disciplines remain connected to the public”.

At the 8 November award ceremony Ms. Chatfield-Taylor presented a talk and answered questions on historic preservation at the American Academy in Rome in the 21st century. You can view the ceremony and that presentation in their entirety below.

The National Building Museum established the Vincent Scully Prize to recognize exemplary practice, scholarship, or criticism in architecture, historic preservation, and urban design. It honors Professor Vincent Scully RAAR’98, the Sterling Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at Yale University and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Miami, whose teaching and scholarship long have profoundly influenced prominent architects and urban planners.

From left, Chase W. Rynd, President of the National Building Museum; Adele Chatfield-Taylor; Vincent Scully Prize jury chair David M. Schwarz

With the award to Adele Chatfield-Taylor, fully five of the 12 Vincent Scully Prizes are held by individuals with a strong connection to the American Academy in Rome:

2010 Adele Chatfield-Taylor FAAR’84

2009 Christopher Alexander

2008 Robert A.M. Stern

2007 (Dec.) Richard Moe RAAR’11

2007 (Jan.) Witold Rybczynski

2006 Phyllis Lambert

2005 (Nov.) His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales

2005 (Jan.) His Highness the Aga Khan

2002 Robert Venturi FAAR’56 and Denise Scott Brown

2001 Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk RAAR’88

2000 Jane Jacobs

1999 Vincent Scully RAAR’98

The National Building Museum in awarding the 2010 Vincent Scully Prize noted that Adele Chatfield-Taylor has had a long career in the arts. After over a decade on the staff of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, Chatfield-Taylor received the AAR’s Rome Prize in 1983, returning to the US in 1984 to become director of the Design Arts program at the National Endowment of the Arts. While there, she helped establish the Mayors’ Institute on City Design; the program continues to thrive today and has inspired many municipal leaders and their staffs to transform their communities through high-quality design and planning.

Since 1988 Adele Chatfield-Taylor has been president of the American Academy in Rome. Chatfield-Taylor was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996; in 2002 she was decorated by the President of the Italian Republic with the award of “Grand Officer of the Ordine al Merito.”

You can read a more detailed biography of Adele Chatfield-Taylor here.

[Complimenti, Adele!—Ed.]

Adele Chatfield-Taylor at the American Academy in Rome, October 2010. Photo: Star Black

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